Caribbean Cruise Offer
– Bridgetown to Fort Lauderdale

Caribbean & Central America Cruise, January 2020

Expect so much more than just beaches on this journey. An amalgamation of placid bays and coconut trees, colonial architecture, fascinating natural history and mouth-watering local cuisine will all feature as you cruise, powerboat, snorkel and sail the glorious Caribbean islands, exploring and discovering something new every day.

Prices are per person including; based on 2 travelling

Includes
  • Departs 14th January 2020
  • 10 Night Cruise
  • Includes Flights & transfers
  • Early Booking Offer*

Price from £3,420 pp

Bridgetown to Fort Lauderdale Silversea Offer

A Caribbean cruise is a must for every traveller so prepare to be dazzled by limpid seas and powder white sands as you enjoy five of the world’s most beautiful islands. Espouse the laid-back attitude on board during two superb sea days, indulge in some world class shopping in St. Bart’s or wander amid 16th-century landmarks. But most of all, relax and reboot amid blue-sky days and starry nights.

ITINERARY

Full 10 night itinerary

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Day 1 – Embarkation
Barbados

This bustling capital city is a major duty-free port with a compact shopping area. The principal thoroughfare is Broad Street, which leads west from National Heroes Square. Amongst top attractions here, the Pelican Village a cluster of workshops located halfway between the cruise-ship terminal and downtown Bridgetown where craftspeople create and sell locally made leather goods, batik, basketry, carvings, jewelry, glass art, paintings, pottery, and other items. It’s open weekdays 9 to 5 and Saturday 9 to 2; things here are most active when cruise ships are in port.Alternatively, sightseers will want to go to the Nidhe Israel Synagogue, which has been providing for the spiritual needs of one of the oldest Jewish congregations in the Western Hemisphere. This synagogue was formed by Jews who left Brazil in the 1620s and introduced sugarcane to Barbados. The adjoining cemetery has tombstones dating from the 1630s. The original house of worship, built in 1654, was destroyed in an 1831 hurricane, rebuilt in 1833, and restored with the assistance of the Barbados National Trust in 1987. Friday-night services are held during the winter months, but the building is open to the public year-round. Shorts are not acceptable during services but may be worn at other times.

Day 2
Bequia Island, Saint Vincent & the Grenadines

Bequia is a Carib word meaning “island of the cloud.” Hilly and green with several golden-sand beaches, Bequia is 9 miles (14½ km) south of St. Vincent’s southwestern shore; with a population of 5,000, it’s the largest of the Grenadines. Although boat building, whaling, and fishing have been the predominant industries here for generations, sailing has now become almost synonymous with Bequia. Admiralty Bay is a favored anchorage for both privately owned and chartered yachts. Lodgings range from comfortable resorts and villas to cozy West Indian—style inns. Bequia’s airport and the frequent ferry service from St. Vincent make this a favorite destination for day-trippers, as well. The ferry docks in Port Elizabeth, a tiny town with waterfront bars, restaurants, and shops where you can buy handmade souvenirs—including the exquisitely detailed model sailboats that are a famous Bequia export. The Easter Regatta is held during the four-day Easter weekend, when revelers gather to watch boat races and celebrate the island’s seafaring traditions with food, music, dancing, and competitive games.To see the views, villages, beaches, and boat building sites around Bequia, hire a taxi at the jetty in Port Elizabeth. Several usually line up under the almond trees to meet each ferry from St. Vincent.

Day 3
Castries, St Lucia

With a lush interior featuring towering mountains, dense rain forest, fertile valleys, and acres of banana plantations, St. Lucia is mostly distinguished by the Pitons—twin peaks that soar high above the ocean floor on the southwest coast. Whether you stay in Soufrière, in the north in or around Rodney Bay Village, or even farther north at Cap Estate, exploring the iconic natural sights—and local history—in Soufrière is a day well spent. Except for a small area in the extreme northeast, one main highway circles all of St. Lucia. The road snakes along the coast, cuts across mountains, makes hairpin turns and sheer drops, and reaches dizzying heights. It takes at least four hours to drive the whole loop. Even at a leisurely pace with frequent sightseeing stops, and whether you’re driving or being driven, the curvy roads make it a tiring drive in a single outing. The West Coast Road between Castries and Soufrière (a 1½-hour journey) has steep hills and sharp turns, but it’s well marked and incredibly scenic. South of Castries, the road tunnels through Morne Fortune, skirts the island’s largest banana plantation (more than 127 varieties of bananas, called “figs” in this part of the Caribbean, grow on the island), and passes through tiny fishing villages. Just north of Soufrière the road negotiates the island’s fruit basket, where most of the mangoes, breadfruit, tomatoes, limes, and oranges are grown. In the mountainous region that forms a backdrop for Soufrière, you will notice 3,118-foot Mt. Gimie (pronounced Jimmy), St. Lucia’s highest peak. Approaching Soufrière, you’ll have spectacular views of the Pitons; the spume of smoke wafting out of the thickly forested mountainside just east of Soufrière emanates from the so-called “drive-in” volcano. The landscape changes dramatically between the Pitons and Vieux Fort on the island’s southeastern tip. Along the South Coast Road traveling southeasterly from Soufrière, the terrain starts as steep mountainside with dense vegetation, progresses to undulating hills, and finally becomes rather flat and comparatively arid. Anyone arriving at Hewanorra International Airport, which is in Vieux Fort, and staying at a resort near Soufrière will travel along this route, a journey of about 45 minutes each way. From Vieux Fort north to Castries, a 1½-hour drive, the East Coast Road twists through Micoud, Dennery, and other coastal villages. It then winds up, down, and around mountains, crosses Barre de l’Isle Ridge, and slices through the rain forest. Much of the scenery is breathtaking. The Atlantic Ocean pounds against rocky cliffs, and acres and acres of bananas and coconut palms blanket the hillsides. If you arrive at Hewanorra and stay at a resort near Castries or Rodney Bay, you’ll travel along the East Coast Road.

Day 4
Roseau, Dominica Island

Although it’s one of the smallest capitals in the Caribbean, Roseau has the highest concentration of inhabitants of any town in the eastern Caribbean. Caribbean vernacular architecture and a bustling marketplace transport visitors back in time. Although you can walk the entire town in about an hour, you’ll get a much better feel for the place on a leisurely stroll. For some years now, the Society for Historical Architectural Preservation and Enhancement (SHAPE) has organized programs and projects to preserve the city’s architectural heritage. Several interesting buildings have already been restored. Lilac House, on Kennedy Avenue, has three types of gingerbread fretwork, latticed verandah railings, and heavy hurricane shutters. The J.W. Edwards Building, at the corner of Old and King George V streets, has a stone base and a wooden second-floor gallery. The Old Market Plaza is the center of Roseau’s historic district, which was laid out by the French on a radial plan rather than a grid, so streets such as Hanover, King George V, and Old radiate from this area. South of the marketplace is the Fort Young Hotel, built as a British fort in the 18th century; the nearby statehouse, public library, and Anglican cathedral are also worth a visit. New developments at the bay front on Dame M.E. Charles Boulevard have brightened up the waterfront.

Day 5
Gustavia, St. Barthelemy

Gustavia is the capital of St. Barthelemy or which is more commonly abbreviated to “St Barts”. Some shops close from noon to 3 or 4, so plan lunch accordingly, but stores stay open past 7 in the evening. You can easily explore all of Gustavia during a two-hour stroll. A good spot to take in the essence of St Barts is rue de la République, alongside the catamarans, yachts, and sailboats.

Day 6
Spanish Town, British Virgin Islands

Virgin Gorda, or “Fat Virgin,” received its name from Christopher Columbus. The explorer envisioned the island as a pregnant woman in a languid recline, with Gorda Peak being her belly and the boulders of the Baths as her toes. Different in topography from Tortola, with an arid landscape covered with scrub brush and cactus, the pace of life is slower here, too. Goats and cattle own the right of way, and the unpretentious friendliness of the people is winning. The top sight (and beach for that matter) is the Baths, which draws scores of cruise-ship passengers and day-trippers to its giant boulders and grottoes that form a perfect snorkeling environment.

Day 7
San Juan, Puerto Rico

If you associate Puerto Rico’s capital with the colonial streets of Old San Juan, then you know only part of the picture. San Juan is a major metropolis, radiating out from the bay on the Atlantic Ocean that was discovered by Juan Ponce de León. More than a third of the island’s nearly 4 million citizens proudly call themselves sanjuaneros. The city may be rooted in the past, but it has its eye on the future. Locals go about their business surrounded by colonial architecture and towering modern structures.By 1508 the explorer Juan Ponce de León had established a colony in an area now known as Caparra, southeast of present-day San Juan. He later moved the settlement north to a more hospitable peninsular location. In 1521, after he became the first colonial governor, Ponce de León switched the name of the island—which was then called San Juan Bautista in honor of St. John the Baptist—with that of the settlement of Puerto Rico (“rich port”).Defended by the imposing Castillo San Felipe del Morro (El Morro) and Castillo San Cristóbal, Puerto Rico’s administrative and population center remained firmly in Spain’s hands until 1898, when it came under U.S. control after the Spanish-American War. Centuries of Spanish rule left an indelible imprint on the city, particularly in the walled area now known as Old San Juan. The area is filled with cobblestone streets and brightly painted, colonial-era structures, and its fortifications have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.Old San Juan is a monument to the past, but most of the rest of the city is planted firmly in the 21st century and draws migrants island-wide and from farther afield to jobs in its businesses and industries. The city captivates residents and visitors alike with its vibrant lifestyle as well as its balmy beaches, pulsing nightclubs, globe-spanning restaurants, and world-class museums. Once you set foot in this city, you may never want to leave.

Day 8
DAY AT SEA

Day 9
DAY AT SEA

Day 10
Key West, Florida

Located closer to Havana than Miami, Key West is synonymous for all that is fabulous. Whether it’s beaches, back country or just a brilliant time that you’re after, Florida’s most southern point holds a wealth of intrigue, both past and present. Famed for its unique originality, Key West is a condensation of the best of the sunshine state – fantastic weather, laid back attitude, deep-rooted history and masses of fantastic, fresh seafood; it’s little wonder that nobody ever wants to leave.Floating in the middle of the Gulf of Mexico, the island has two very definite personalities: bookish and bizarre. On the one hand, the literary festivals, exquisite Caribbean architecture and splendid art galleries attract the bourgeoisie, while on the other, the eccentricity and reticence to be associated with “the mainland” attracts all kinds of “happies” –new era hippies. The two dichotomies live peacefully side by side and have done ever since travellers started arriving in the 1960s — Key West being one of the three big K’s on the hippie path to enlightenment (Kuta and Kathmandu are the others).But past the idiosyncrasies of the Key Westers, and you will find an island that is literally brimming over with spectacular sights and wonderful wilderness. From Henry S. Truman’s Little White House and Ernest Hemmingway’s house and studio, to botanical gardens and marine sanctuaries, visitors will leave this fascinating island wanting more.Best seen by foot, bike or boat, this is an island to be explored al fresco.

Day 11 – Debark
Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Like many southeast Florida neighbors, Fort Lauderdale has long been revitalizing. In a state where gaudy tourist zones often stand aloof from workaday downtowns, Fort Lauderdale exhibits consistency at both ends of the 2-mile Las Olas corridor. The sparkling look results from upgrades both downtown and on the beachfront. Matching the downtown’s innovative arts district, cafés, and boutiques is an equally inventive beach area, with hotels, cafés, and shops facing an undeveloped shoreline, and new resort-style hotels replacing faded icons of yesteryear. Despite wariness of pretentious overdevelopment, city leaders have allowed a striking number of glittering high-rises. Nostalgic locals and frequent visitors fret over the diminishing vision of sailboats bobbing in waters near downtown; however, Fort Lauderdale remains the yachting capital of the world, and the water toys don’t seem to be going anywhere.

SILVER SHADOW

Ship details

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Silversea Silver Shadow


Authentic experiences. Simple pleasures. Shared moments. Silversea’s Millennium Class luxury cruise ships Silver Shadow and Silver Whisper offer you freedom and space to design your day. Slightly larger in size than ships Silver Cloud and Silver Wind, Silver Shadow retains Silversea’s essence – spacious suites, a complement of only 388 guests, superior service – paired with a lively cosmopolitan atmosphere and enhanced amenities. Aboard the Silver Shadow, energize body and soul with complimentary Pilates and yoga in the expanded fitness center. Savour fine wines and French gastronomy in La Dame, enjoy authentic Italian cuisine in La Terrazza, or simply gaze at endless ocean views from The Grill. Not forgetting the regional-inspired The Restaurant, dining at sea has never been so good.

Key Facts

  • Guests 388
  • Crew 302
  • Length 610 feet

ALL-INCLUSIVE DETAILS

What’s included on-board

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Included in the cruise fare


With Silversea cruises you enjoy free-flowing premium wines and spirits, delicious gourmet cuisine, in-suite dining, full butler service for every suite and of course all gratuities.

  • Spacious suites – over 85% with private verandas
  • Butler service in every suite
  • Free WiFi throughout the ship
  • Personalised service – nearly one crew member for every guest
  • Multiple restaurants, diverse cuisine, open-seating dining
  • Beverages in-suite and throughout the ship, including champagne, select wines and spirits
  • 24-hour dining service
  • On-board entertainment and enrichment lecturers
  • Complimentary transportation into town in most ports
  • On-board gratuities

Terms & Conditions:

  • *Book and pay in full by 30th April 2019 to qualify for offer
  • Fare based on 2 passengers sharing a suite

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